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Salem and Montrose picking up the pieces after storm damage

Groups gathered around in Salem, helping clear branches and trees left lying on the road. In Montrose, people were quick to clear roads and make room.
Published: May. 13, 2022 at 9:38 PM CDT
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SALEM, S.D. (Dakota News Now) - The nursing home in Salem is just one example of the extensive damage caused by last night’s storms. The building has lost some of it’s roof, most of it’s windows, and it will be a long time until the before the building can ever be used again.

Groups gathered around in Salem, helping clear branches and trees left lying on the road.

“Almost immediately, I heard chainsaws screaming, people helping get trees out of the street, blocking off places where there were powerlines down. Just everybody seems to come together.” said Salem Mayor Shawn “Ace” English.

Salem isn’t the only town in South Dakota cleaning up, after a powerful Derecho hit the state.

“We actually have damage reports from 28 different counties. So this is extremely extensive damage . It’s really an unprecedented weather event for South Dakota, for it to be this widespread.” said South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem.

In Montrose, people were quick to clear roads and make room to the school. Tomorrow is graduation, and they still plan on going ahead.

“The city came through and took the trees roads, so that people could get through. They’ll get them cut up, it just takes a little time.” said Montrose resident Paul Klaudt.

But the damage is also extensive in the country. Andrew Streff spent the day re-shingling his roof, but he’s more concerned about his family’s damaged grain bins.

“Before we had this big storm go through, if you wanted a grain bin, it was at least a three to four month waiting period before you could get one on average. And now, I can’t image what that’s going to be. Just because everyone in the area is going to need grain bins, or just about everyone.” said Streff.

And they still have plenty to do out in the field.

“There’s debris out in fields, there’s grain bin roofs out in fields. That all has to be picked up and moved away before we can still plant a crop, and we need to get that in soon.” said Streff.

English said they’re fortunate for what they have, even with all of the damage left behind. He says the first day of cleanup is the first step on a long road to recovery for the town.

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