Landowners gather to hear concerns about carbon pipelines

The topic of carbon dioxide pipelines has become a hot one in South Dakota over the summer. That’s bringing together many who live in towns in the country.
Published: Sep. 29, 2022 at 9:24 PM CDT
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FLANDREAU, S.D. (Dakota News Now) - The topic of carbon dioxide pipelines has become a hot one in South Dakota over the summer. That’s bringing together many who live in towns and out in the country about what planned projects could mean for them.

Betty Strom, a Lake County resident, is no stranger to pipelines on her land. An oil pipeline currently runs through her property, and now she’s concerned about carbon dioxide pipelines that could be making their way to the state.

“I think more people are catching on and wanting to know more about it. But we still have a lot of people that don’t know, or think they can just say no and then they won’t bother them anymore. But that’s not how it works.” Strom said.

Landowners and individuals in Moody County gathered in Flandreau Thursday night to hear concerns from Strom and others about potential pipelines. Strom said they’re worried about what other projects could be in the future.

“These tax credits are really lucrative. And so, there are a lot of companies looking at that. We’re afraid we’re going to become a pipeline highway through South Dakota.” Strom said.

That concern is also coming from the group South Dakota Easement Team, concerned about how close regulations allow pipelines to come within buildings and homes.

“We need to have proper setbacks and depths. Because right now federal guidelines say, and it doesn’t even pertain CO2 pipelines, is that the pipe has to be buried three feet deep, and it can’t come within 50 feet of your house.” South Dakota Easement Team member Rick Bonander said.

Questions about the use of eminent domain also came up... with Strom and others stating that they don’t want pipelines on their land that won’t benefit them or their neighbors.

“Eminent domain is supposed to be for public use. You, nor I, nor the public is going to be using that CO2.” Strom said.

Strom said while she has many concerns about pipelines and what issues they could bring to the state, she’s more focused on what those that could be affected by them know, and wants everyone to have a full picture.